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Business

ACC 106: Financial Accounting

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of the accounting process, including the recording of business transactions, the adjustment of accounts, and the preparation of financial statements. Accounting for the assets and liabilities of a firm are emphasized, with an introduction to accounting for corporations. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Business Administration majors and minors. Sophomore standing recommended.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 202: Managerial Accounting

This course stresses the interaction of management and accounting, enabling students to enhance and apply their basic accounting skills in managerial decision-making in the areas of planning and controlling operations. Areas studied include cost terminology and behavior; break-even analysis; relevant costing; master budgeting with an emphasis on cash flow and income projection; responsibility accounting systems and variance analysis. The Statement of Cash Flows and current issues in management accounting are also covered. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACC106.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 275: Accounting for the Hospitality Industry

This course is an introduction to the Uniform System of Accounts for Hotels and Restaurants, including specific applications of managerial accounting and decision support systems for the hospitality field. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: BUS170, ACC106.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 300: Intermediate Accounting I

This course, along with Intermediate Accounting II (ACC301), forms the foundation of the Accounting Concentration. The course focuses on the problems and issues related to the collection, analysis, and reporting of financial information for external decision-making and regulatory purposes. The course examines the environment of financial reporting and the FASB conceptual framework. The accounting cycle and preparation of financial statements are examined in detail. Specific balance sheet topics explored include: cash and accounts receivable; inventories; property, plant and equipment; and intangible assets. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Business Administrators majors in Accounting Concentration and Corporate Finance-Accounting Concentration.
Prerequisite: ACC106.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 301: Intermediate Accounting II

This course continues the examination of components of the balance sheet started in Intermediate Accounting I (ACC300). Issues related to current and long-term liabilities are examined. Various stockholders¿ equity topics are explored including: dividends, stock options and issuance of stock. The course also examines special topics in financial reporting such as: income recognition; interperiod tax allocation and leases. The Statement of Cash Flows is also studied in depth. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Business Administration majors in Accounting Concentration and Corporate Finance-Accounting Concentration.
Prerequisite: ACC300.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 305: Federal Taxation

This course provides an understanding of federal income tax principles and concepts which pertain to all tax reporting entities. It emphasizes the preparation of federal income tax returns and the ability to utilize varied references in dealing with tax accounting problems. Particular emphasis is placed on the subjects of gross income, deductions, capital gains and losses, and the determination of taxable income. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ACC304 or ACC304N.
Prerequisite: ACC106.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 306: Cost Accounting

This course will introduce the concept and characteristics of cost with specific emphasis on decision-making situations that require accounting data. This course discusses the application of costs to process, job order and standard cost accounting systems. Concepts such as activity-based costing, just-in-time inventory systems and material requirements planning are also covered. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Business Administration majors in Accounting concentration.
Prerequisite: ACC202.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 350: Forensic Accounting

This course will survey the field of forensic accounting including the use of accounting techniques to discover fraud and malfeasance, obtain evidence for legal action, and prevent future illegal activities within various types of organizations. The course will use both actual and theoretical case studies in the context of group projects to simulate real-life situations. These activities will be studied in the light of recent accounting malfeasance in major corporations and government investigations of illegal and improper activities in all types of organizations. There will also be discussed in conjunction with the above specifics, the application of and influence of global goals upon the field and its relationship to social, international, ethical, and diversity issues. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACC106 or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 364: Accounting Information Systems

Surveys information technology, transaction processing, transaction cycle internal control, computer security, systems development, and reporting systems. Examines several typical AIS application subsystems, such as order entry/sales, inventory, purchasing/payables/cash disbursements, billing/receivables/cash receipts, and materials planning/production. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACC300.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 400: Advanced Accounting

This course continues to build on some of the principles and concepts covered in Intermediate Accounting I (ACC 300). It focuses primarily on accounting for business combinations, especially the preparation of consolidated financial statements and related problems. The course also covers accounting for partnerships, the international accounting standards setting process, and accounting for foreign currency transactions. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACC300.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 405: Advanced Federal Taxation

Examines in greater depth the federal income statutes relating to individuals, partnerships and corporations. Also includes an introduction to estate and gift taxes, and an introduction to taxation of trusts. Three lecture hours per week. Concentration elective: Accounting and Corporate Finance-Accounting. Not open to students who have received credit for ACC414 or ACC414N.
Prerequisite: ACC304, ACC304N or ACC305.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 407: Auditing Theory and Practice

A study of the practical application of accounting knowledge to the problems of auditing. In addition to auditing theory, the course is designed to assist the student in the verification of records, the valuation and analysis of accounts, and the presentation of conclusions. The responsibility of the auditor and the audit program are also examined utilizing simulated exercises. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACC300.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 420N: Accounting for Governmental and Non-profit Entities

This course investigates the principles of fund accounting as it is used in the accounting systems of state and local governmental units, as well as public and private educational institutions and hospitals. Includes accounting for activities in the funds legally required to be used for internal reporting purposes and the current financial reporting requirements. Three lecture hours per week. Concentration elective: Accounting. Not open to students who have received credits for ACC420.
Prerequisite: ACC300.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 485: Accounting Internship

An academic work program under the auspices of various business and non-profit organizations in areas directly related to the student's academic interest in Accounting. Must meet departmental requirements and have Department Chairperson's approval before registration. Limited to Accounting Concentration or Corporate Financial-Accounting Concentration, Juniors and Seniors.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 720: Financial Accounting for Managers

Examines financial reporting as managerial communication about financial condition and performance to external users and as the basis for decision making by creditors and investors. Includes discussion of financial implication of reporting alternatives, the role of the external auditor, and risk management through internal controls.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 800: Accounting Analysis for Decision Making

Identification an analysis of the accounting information that managers use to make decisions for the business and its functional areas. Four major topics are considered: managerial accounting concepts of cost behaviors and cost traceability using full cost and incremental cost models, approaches for structuring non-routine decisions, planning tools to motivate and coordinate employees, and the use of feedback to evaluate goal attainment.
Prerequisites: matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 805: Tax Factors in Business: a Decision Making Approach

This course examines the effects of taxes on business decisions, focusing primarily on planning implications for sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. It also includes a general overview of tax laws regarding income, exclusions, deductions and credits.
Prerequisites: FIN710 and BUS802N.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 830: Advanced Accounting Systems

This course provides an understanding of enterprise accounting systems structures and controls. Topics include current systems documentation techniques, industry internal control standards, internal control implementation, and IT auditing. Controls are demonstrated with a hands-on component that includes both transaction entry and the application controls within the software.
Prerequisite: Matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

ACC 860: Global Financial Reporting Issues

The course provides an understanding of the international dimensions of accounting and financial reporting. Topics include foreign currency translation; financial reporting and changing prices; international financial standards and analysis; financial risk management; international taxation issues and transfer pricing as well as other international financial reporting topics. Students will be able to prepare and analyze financial statements in the context of a complex global environment.
Prerequisites: Matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 170: Introduction to Business

This course provides the student with a basic understanding of the field of business. It introduces the student to the major functional areas of business: marketing, management, accounting/finance, and operations & decision sciences. The course also presents the topics of entrepreneurship, forms of business organizations, legal environment, and the free enterprise system. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Business Administration majors and minors.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 170H: Introduction to Business: Honors

This introductory course provides the student with a basic understanding of the field of business. It introduces the student to the major functional areas of business: marketing, management, accounting/finance, and management information systems. The course also presents the topics of entrepreneurship, forms of business organizations, the legal environment, and the free market system. Introduction to Business provides a basic foundation for the student who may want to specialize in some aspect of business in college, and it also provides the opportunity for non-business majors to learn about the business world in which they will someday be both producers and consumers. Not open to students who have received credit for BUS170. Open to all honors students of any major, and non-honors business students with express permission from the Chairperson of the Management Department. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 252: Business Law I

Business Law I surveys the role of law in the United States. The student is introduced to law and the legal system, and is given an overview of the court system, civil process, and litigation. Such topics as crimes, intentional torts, negligence, and strict liability are presented. Contracts, as they apply to Business Law, the Uniform Commercial Code and contracts covered by it, including consumer transactions; and the law of agency, including contract rights and liabilities of the principal and agent, are covered comprehensively. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 302: Study Travel Seminar (international)

This course is an international study/travel course that combines an orientation on elected business issues related to a country or region with intensive field study in the area concerned. Topics and locations will vary from semester to semester. Intensive study travel components require student travel, additional fees may be associated with this course. This course may be repeated for credit with permission of Department Chair.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: World Cultures

BUS 352: Business Law II

Business Law II is a survey of law in business, particularly in the areas of partnerships, corporations, personal property, including bailments, secure transactions, real property, and commercial paper and negotiable instruments. The course will cover Consumer Law transactions and the Uniform Commercial Code, where applicable. Three lecture hours per week. Open to Business Administration majors and minors and Management concentration Minors.
Prerequisite: BUS252.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 370: International Business

This course is a survey of the legal and cultural environment of global business; the international financial system; management of global network; personnel and labor relations; international marketing; international economics, trade, and finance; the multinational enterprise; and supranational organizations. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BUS170, MGT332, MKT241N.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 470: Business Policy & Strategy

3 credits. W-III. BUS 470 focuses on general managers’ roles and responsibilities to formulate and recommend corporate level or business level strategy based on the interaction between a firm’s competitive capabilities and the firm’s macro-environment and industry environment. The course focuses on macro-environment analysis, industry and competitor analysis, and analysis of the firm’s mission, vision, and strategic and financial objectives, analysis of the firm’s competitive capabilities in the areas of strategy (business and functional levels) strategy implementation, resources, use of value chain to minimize costs and increase value to the firms stakeholders, analysis of the firm’s top management value and culture on formulation and implementing strategy, analysis of the firm’s financial performance, and control mechanisms for monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of strategic decisions during implementation. Three lecture hours per week. Required of and limited to Business Administration seniors.
Prerequisites: Senior status and the following courses: MKT241N, FIN301, and either MGT231 or MGT332.
Pre- or Co-requisite: W-II course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

BUS 473: Export/import Management

Managing the export/import department; government regulations affecting imports; financing, insuring, transporting, and marketing of exported or imported raw materials and finished products; methods of purchasing foreign products and selling domestic goods abroad; joint marketing; licensing; distributor relations. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: BUS370.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 790: Internship in Business

An academic work program under the auspices of various business and non-profit organizations in areas directly related to the student's interests in business administration. The student is also supervised by a faculty member who will maintain contact with the sponsoring organization and with the student during the internship.

Credits: 3.00 - 12.00

BUS 802: Legal and Ethical Environment

A study of the legal and ethical framework within which the formal business organization must operate. Topics included are the law of contracts, sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, corporations, bankruptcy, consumer protection, and agency. Emphasis will be placed on the rights and liabilities of all parties. Case study method will be used extensively.
Prerequisites: matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 840: Managing in the Global Business Environment

This course intensively scrutinizes the setting and scope of international business and the dimensions of multi-national enterprise. The student is expected to become skilled in the identifications of strategies and adaptations of functional activities in marketing, production and supply, finance and control, human resources, and government and public relations to deal with the differences to be encountered in exporting or making direct investments in foreign business environments.
Prerequisites: matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator; and BUS802.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 850: Ethical Issues in Business

This course explores the delicate balance between business profitability and ethical practice, particularly as it relates to governmental regulation, consumer welfare, employee relations and environmental concerns. Text material and selected case studies will be utilized to provide a vehicle for discussing and understanding the social responsibility of business as inseparable from its economic function.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 860: Entrepreneurship

This course is designed to examine the entrepreneurial process involved in new venture creation and start-ups. The approach is both conceptual and pragmatic. Students will understand entrepreneurship beyond the functional boundaries as an interdisciplinary, cross-functional activity. The course is ideal for individuals seeking to start their own businesses, and who wish to learn more about the analytic and creative processes involved in developing their ideas into a successful new venture.
Prerequisites: FIN710, MKT790N.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 870: Business Policy and Strategy

Students must have successfully completed 36 credit hours prior to taking this course. Designed as a capstone course for students in the program, the course studies the strategies employed by corporations in planning, selecting and implementing objectives. Through analysis of various assigned cases, the student is expected to become skilled in the development and analysis of business strategy and policy, which requires familiarity with functional activities such as marketing, production, finance and human resource management.
Prerequisites: successful completion of 18 credit hours in the MBA program beyond the foundation courses, including BUS802, MGT800, MKT805, ACC800, and FIN800.

Credits: 3.00

BUS 875: Directed Study

An independent research project supervised by a member of the Graduate Business Administration Faculty.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 100: Personal Financial Planning

This course focuses on personal financial issues and ethical dilemmas faced by individuals and families. While learning the key concepts and procedures used in sound financial planning, students will understand the impact of their environmental and social factors and their individual actions on their financial future, their family and the society. Students will research and use data effectively to formulate their own financial plan including taxes, credit, insurance, investments and retirement needs. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Pers Growth & Responsibility

FIN 301: Principles of Finance

This course provides an introduction to the field of finance. It examines the financial system of a modern global economy and concepts and principles related to the financial management of global corporations. Topics include financial markets and instruments, risk and return, time value of money, valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital and financial analysis. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Business Administration majors. Not open to students who have received credit for FIN 322. Prerequisites: ACC 106.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 309: Corporate Finance

This course exposes students to analyzing and managing risk and decision making involving corporate finance. Topics include cash flow estimation and capital budgeting, capital structure and financing policy, working capital management and dividend policy. This course entails extensive use of spreadsheets. Three lecture hours per week. required of Business Administration majors, Finance and Corporate Finance-Accounting concentrations. Not open to students who have received credit for FIN 409. Prerequisite: FIN 301 or FIN 322.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 323A: Financial Institutions Management

This course examines the economic and legal environment and key factors affecting the management of financial institutions. The effects of the implementation of central bank policies on the operations of commercial banks and other financial institutions are discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the principal means by which these policies achieve their objectives, including open market operations, discount rate changes, and reserve requirement changes. The impacts of changes in legislation, technology, and product innovations on financial institutions are examined. Financial instruments and services provided by these institutions are also considered. Three lecture hours per week. Elective limited to Business Administration majors. Not open to students who have received credit for FIN323.
Prerequisite: FIN 301 or FIN 322.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 350: International Finance

This course focuses on problems of financial management of multinational corporations. Particular emphasis is placed on techniques available to manage companies' exposure rate risk. Includes assessment of international monetary systems, aspects of international trade, and international asset and liability management. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Business Administration majors, Finance concentration; and open to all other students who have taken FIN 301 (previously FIN 322) as an elective for International Business and Corporate Finance-Accounting concentrations. Not open to students who have received credit for FIN 450. Prerequisite: FIN 301 or FIN 322.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 364: Real Estate

This course surveys the principles of real estate law, management, and investing. Both commercial real estate and private real estate are covered along with the tax aspects of ownership. Three lecture hours per week. Elective limited to Business Administration majors, Finance, Corporate Finance-Accounting, Entrepreneurship and Management Concentrations. Not open to students who have received credit for FIN434. Prerequisite: FIN301 or FIN322.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 423A: Entrepreneurial Finance

This course explores the financing strategies of corporations, especially new companies. Sources of funds examined include public and private placements of debt and equity securities, the Small Business Administration, venture capital, business angels and local redevelopment authorities. Financial forecasting and planning and the role of options and warrants in contract negotiations are studied. The financial aspects of strategic and business planning are examined. Three lecture hours per week. Elective limited to Business Administration majors, Finance, Corporate Finance-Accounting, and Entrepreneurship concentrations. Not open to students who have received credit for FIN423.
Prerequisite: FIN301.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 466: Investment and Security Analysis

Key concepts and practices of investment are covered, along with methodologies of security analysis. Topics include introduction to security markets; various types of investment vehicles such as common and preferred stocks, bonds, and mutual funds; investment environment; economic, market, industry, and security analysis; and portfolio concepts. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Business Administration majors, Finance and Corporate Finance-Accounting concentrations. Prerequisite: FIN 301 or FIN 322.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 468: Advanced Financial Analysis

This course introduces financial statement analysis from the company managers', lenders', and stock investors' points of view, and covers issues such as revenue recognition, earnings quality, ratio analysis, financial modeling, bankruptcy predictions, and firm valuation using discounted cash flow techniques. Recognition and appreciation of messages, biases, and limitations of financial statements are discussed, while common size statements and trend analysis are done using spreadsheet software. Required of Business Majors; Corporate Finance-Concentration; Elective limited to Finance and ODS concentrations. Prerequisites: FIN 309 or FIN 409.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 469: Finance Seminar

This is a seminar building on previous finance courses and focusing heavily on articles and case discussion from all areas of finance. Concepts and analytical tools used in corporate financial decision making are covered. Students also examine current issues in finance as evidenced by reports in business media. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Business Administration Seniors with Finance concentration. Prerequisites: (FIN 350 or FIN 450) and FIN 466.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 485: Finance Internship

An academic work program in businesses or non-profit organizations in areas directly related to the finance field. Must meet departmental requirement and have Department Chairperson's approval before registration. Limited to Finance and Corporate Finance-Accounting Concentrations, Juniors or Seniors. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisites: (FIN 301 or FIN 322) and approval of department chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 720: Foundations of Finance

This course introduces theory and application of concepts related to corporate financial management decisions. Topics include agency relationship, financial statement analysis, risk-return relationship, time value of money, asset valuation models, capital budgeting techniques, cost of capital, and financial ethics.
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: Financial Accounting for Managers (ACC720).

Credits: 3.00

FIN 751: Fundamentals of Financial Planning and Insurance

This course introduces students to the financial planning process with an overview of risk management and insurance, income tax planning, investment planning, retirement planning, employee benefits, and estate planning. Students will learn about time value of money, legal/ethical aspects of financial planning. The course also covers details of insurance planning.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 753: Retirement and Employee Benefits Planning

This course covers the importance of retirement planning and provides students with knowledge of public plans (Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid etc.) and retirement plans including DB and DC plans and their regulatory provisions. Individual retirement plans like KEOGH, SRA, IRA etc. are also addressed as will other non-qualified DC plans. Other life changing events and their impact on retirement planning will also be discussed.
Prerequisite: FIN751.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 757: Income Tax Planning

This course examines the Federal Income Tax Statutes as they relate to individuals, partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, estates and trusts. The course examines how individuals can utilize their understanding of these tax statutes so as to minimize tax liabilities.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 759: Estate Planning

This course explores the complex legal, tax, and financial issues in transfer of property, wills, trust, gifts, etc. The course introduces students to the areas of wills, probate, marital deductions, charitable contributions, charitable trusts and planning for incapacity. Special attention is given to the use of trusts, insurance, and taxation issues in estate planning, etc. The course provides the students with the basic tools necessary to advise clients in estate planning matters.
Prerequisite: FIN751.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 780: Investment Analysis & Portfolio Management

This course examines key concepts and practices of investments. Included are topics in introduction of security markets; types of investment vehicles such as common and preferred stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and derivatives; investment environment; economy review; industry and security analysis; and portfolio concepts. Prerequisite or corequisite: FIN 751 or FIN 720 or chairperson's approval.

Credits: 3.00

FIN 785: Case Studies in Financial Plan

Students will integrate key financial planning concepts, including investment analysis, retirement and employee benefits planning, insurance and income tax planning and estate planning. The primary pedagogy is through case studies. Students will work individually or in teams to develop solutions to realistic situations described in cases and present their recommendations. Three lecture hours.
Prerequisites: FIN751, FI753*, FIN757*, FIN759*, FIN780*. (*One of these may be taken concurrently.)

Credits: 3.00

FIN 800: Financial Decision Making and Value Creation

This course focuses on the application of financial theories in corporate decision making, building upon and expanding concepts introduced in Foundations of Finance (FIN720). Topics include valuation models with uncertainty, cash flow forecasting, modern portfolio theory, asset pricing models, capital structure, cost of capital, working capital management and introduction to option pricing models. Spreadsheet software and cases will be used.
Prerequisites: matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 300: Fire Science Administration

This course is designed to introduce the student to modern management concepts and their relevance to the fire service. It will explore the skills and techniques used by competent management in business, government, and voluntary organizations, with emphasis on their linking to fire science. Decision-making, communications, motivation, leadership, stress and time management, among other management principles will be studied in depth. Three lecture hours per week. FSC major requirement.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 350: Advanced Arson Detection and Prevention

This course studies the problems and techniques of fire investigation, the chemistry of fire, and combustion properties of selected fuels. Emphasis on modern investigative methods and on the application and assistance of various scientific aids available to the fire investigator. Arson prevention programs, their success and/or failure, will be discussed. Three lecture hours per week. FSC major requirement.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 360: Fire Service Law

This course will cover the legal principles that serve as the foundation for proper decision-making and protocol in a fire service organization. Case studies will be used to explain how to avoid problems by learning from the experience of others. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 370: Managing Community Based Fire Prevention Programs

This course provides fundamental information on the organization and management of a community based fire prevention program with emphasis on the fire prevention bureau structure and functions, the local and state code process, the business of fire prevention, budgeting and cost recovery, and public education. Case studies will be used in this course. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 380: Managing the Emergency Scene: Principles and Practices

This course will provide an educational foundation to prepare members of the fire service for the structure and accountability required to assume responsibility at an emergency scene. Emphasis will be on proper decision-making strategies and tactics. An important element of this course is the use of case studies to show the application of theory to real world situations. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 520: Internship in Fire Science

The internship affords students the opportunity to translate theory into practice, to apply and gain knowledge, and to experience directly the operations and functions of a Fire Service agency. This fieldwork may assist students in clarifying their career goals and exploring future employment opportunities. Interns must be available for eight to ten hours per week for fieldwork and regular meetings with the Coordinator of Fire Science. Open only for FSC majors.
Prerequisites: FSC300, FSC350. OM/MIS Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

HRI 200: Introduction to Hospitality Management

This course offers a comprehensive overview of hospitality management and provides students with opportunities to explore various facets of the industry as a potential future profession. This course will serve as the foundation for advanced area-specific Hospitality Management courses, including Hotel Operations Management, Food and Beverage Management, Hospitality Accounting, Hospitality Marketing and Sales, and others. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: BUS170.

Credits: 3.00

HRI 201: Hotel Operations Management

The course requires students to compare room division management in large hotels with those in small hotels including reservations, front desk operations, accounting, housekeeping, and auxiliary with appropriate computer applications. The course focuses on management history, planning, organization, leadership and current and future management issues.
Prerequisite: HRI200.

Credits: 3.00

HRI 204: Food and Beverage Management

Management of both commercial and institutional food service operations. The focus is on management by menu concept, site selection process, functional cycle of control (purchasing, receiving, storing, and issuing), production forecast and scheduling. Development of operational and financial food and beverage cost controls, including menu pricing, budgeting, and internal/external sales analyses, including computer applications.
Prerequisite: HRI200.

Credits: 3.00

HRI 350: Human Resources Management in the Hospitality Industry

The course covers planning for management of personnel including recruitment, selection and evaluation of employees in the industry. Focus on key hospitality resource management issues of a general, technical and social nature including communication, motivation and leadership, job stress and safety, security, government regulations, and discrimination.
Prerequisites: HRI201, HRI204.

Credits: 3.00

HRI 450: Meetings, Conferences, and Conventions

Strategic and logistical considerations in the managing, the planning, development, marketing and implementation of meetings, conferences and conventions. Included in the foregoing is the management of the facility, involvement of the meeting planner for the client and the negotiation of the contract for the use.
Prerequisites: HRI200.

Credits: 3.00

HRI 475: Casino Operations and Management

An examination of the unique operating conditions associated with casino management. The focus is on the history of gambling and on the environment, operations, regulation, accounting and the economics, moral and cultural issues of gaming.
Prerequisites: HRI201, HRI204.

Credits: 3.00

HRI 500: Hospitality Internship

An academic work program in the hospitality industry for on the job development. Supervision is provided by a qualified individual in the organization with frequent consultation with a faculty member. A written report is required of the student. An internship may be part-time or full-time but a minimum of nine hours per week for the entire semester is required.
Prerequisites: HRI 201 or HRI 204, Juniors and Seniors only.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 220: Entrepreneurship for Non-business Majors

Entrepreneurship for Non-Business Majors and Entrepreneurship minors is designed to assist students in the Arts & Sciences and in Human Services to obtain the knowledge base and business skill set to prepare them to open their own small businesses. Topics to be covered include idea generation and opportunity analysis, competitive analysis, development of competitive advantage, building a customer base, cash flow statements and budgets, legal foundations and basics of contracts, financing, production management, basic human resource management, marketing, pricing, ratio analysis, buying a business or franchising, harvest and exit. This course involves hands-on, problem based learning with real world scenarios and exercises. Students will be challenged to find solutions to problems as seen through the various roles of business owner, marketer, and financial analyst. Limited to non-business majors and entrepreneurial minors. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 231: Management Theory and Practice

Introduces the principles of management from the viewpoint of the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling functions. Includes consideration of the social, technological, international, and environmental factors affecting management. Examines the management practices of actual organizations as they deal with competition and productivity issues. Makes use of case analysis, student projects, and experiential exercises. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 301: Employment Law for Business

This course examines modern workplace issues and introduces students to the major employment laws regulating employer and employee conduct. Students will become acquainted with federal and state statutes as well as leading court and agency decisions. Topics covered in the course include: the at-will employment relationship; discrimination in employment, drug and alcohol testing; fair labor standards; safety and health; workers compensation; labor laws. Three lecture hours per week. Limited to junior and senior students.
Prerequisites: BUS252 and either MGT231 or MGT332.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 320: Career Management and Professional Development for Business Students

This course prepares undergraduate business student with basic knowledge and skills for transitioning from school to the workplace. Students taking this course will explore their career goals, understand professional expectations, and tailor their strengths to potential employers' demands. Students taking this course will work on their professional qualifications, combining internal awareness and professionalism with hand-on direction and guidance in resume and cover letter development, research techniques, networking tips, and interviewing skills. Readings, lectures, assessments, small group activities, and practical projects are the pedagogical methods used to meet the course objectives. One lecture hour per week. Business majors and minors only.
Prerequisite: BUS170

Credits: 1.00

MGT 330: Human Resource Management

Focuses on contemporary human resource management practices. Emphasis on both qualitative and quantitative aspects of human resource management including recruitment, selection, performance appraisal, training, compensation, and labor relations. Course work comprises projects, cases, and exercises related to each aspect of human resources. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for MGT331 or MGT431.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 332: Organizational Behavior

This course deals with all aspects of behavior in and by formal organizations in the field of business. Elements of the social sciences are included in an examination of the research dealing with organizational and administrative problems in business. Activities include case studies, simulations and research with individual and group projects. In addition, the course addresses aspects of corporate culture as it pertains to group dynamics. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: BUS170 and sophomore status.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 333: Compensation and Benefits Management

This course examines wage, salary, and benefits programs within both profit and non-profit organizations. Those practices, environmental forces, statutes, and managerial philosophies that shape total compensation programs for first line, managerial, and executive employees are explored. Also analyzed are current issues in compensation management and common obstacles to the establishment, administration, and evaluation of compensation programs.
Prerequisite: MGT330.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 337: Small Business Management

This course emphasizes those aspects of management that are uniquely important to small business firms. Topics covered include: the role of small business in today's economy; the small business owner; business planning and development; forms of ownership; pros and cons of buying an existing business; franchising; finances; purchasing; inventory; risk management; marketing; government regulation and assistance; managing for growth; and the international aspects of small business. Examples of actual business situations are used. Three lecture hours per week. Open to Business Administration majors and minors, Management minors and Entrepreneurship minors. Not open to students who have received credit for MGT350.
Prerequisites: MKT241N, FIN322, and either MGT231 or MGT332.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 345: International Human Relations Management

This course is for students who are contemplating a career in Human Resources Management. The course presents an overview of the unique challenges to Human Resource Management due to international operations. Topics include strategic human resource planning, international HR policy development, global staffing, performance management, training and development, international compensation and understanding cultural and communications differences that have significant effects on organizations.
Prerequisite: MGT330.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 349: Management of Diversity in Organizations

Using a theoretical and practical framework, this course prepares students to enter an increasingly broad workplace in which diversity not only must be accepted but also understood, encouraged, and managed. Using assigned course readings, real-world cases, online research, and challenging exercises, students will learn how to promote and manage diversity.
Prerequisite: MGT330.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 375: Corporate Social Responsibility

The need for business and society to work together has never been more critical. The course examines a wide range of societal forces that have evolved into an increasingly complex web of social, government and business relationships. Society is changing and raising its expectations for business and government. The existence, power and changing nature of these relationships and expectations require careful and ethical management attention and action. The course focuses on the roles and responsibilities of business in society. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: BUS170 or BUS170H.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 403: Leadership in Management

This course explains in depth the historic and contemporary views of effective leadership. Particular emphasis is placed upon situational and contingency theories as well as the impact of the leader's belief system upon subordinates and the organization. Biographies of particularly effective leaders serve as cases. Leadership skills are presented via appropriate experiential exercises. Three lecture hours per week. Open to Business Administration majors and minors and Management concentrations or minors.
Prerequisite: MGT231 or MGT332.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 415: Employee Training and Development in Organizations

Explores the factors involved with planning, implementing, and evaluating training and development programs within organizations as these programs relate to organizational objectives and strategies. This course equips students with the insight, knowledge and tools to understand how to facilitate training's strategic role, it's available methods, and the new technologies used in training.
Prerequisite: MGT330.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 420: Business Plan Development

Business plans convey the aspirations of the entrepreneur in a document. Writing the business plan is a multi-step process that outlines the prospective opportunity and explains steps the owner or entrepreneur will take to realize his or her aspirations. The purposes of a business plan include marketing the firm, obtaining financing and other resources, gathering commitments from stakeholders, and identifying the actions the owner/entrepreneur intends to take. Three lecture hours.
Prerequisites: BUS170, and either MGT337 or MGT350.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 442: Labor/management Relations

This course surveys the growth and development of the labor movement in the United States. Topics include employer/employee relations, legal/government environment, wage/benefit issues with economic factors, and the process of collective bargaining. Course activities include historical research, projects, case studies, and a collective bargaining simulation. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for MGT432.
Prerequisite: MGT231 or MGT332.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 444: Change Management

Change, both planned and reactive, is a constant in business and life. Managers' effectiveness with managing change directly correlates with organizational performance. Managers must identify, implement and lead an organization's changes in mission, vision, organizational values, culture, strategy, resources and performance standards. Managers must also account for external situational characteristics when managing internal change. The course topics include managerial skills specific to managing change, types of change and their respective causes, barriers to change, implementing change, strategies for communicating change, and sustaining change.
Prerequisites: MGT332, Senior status.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 445: Conflict Resolution and Negotiation Skills for Managers

In most team-based organizations, it is necessary for managers to build coalitions among diverse groups of employees, customers, suppliers and other stakeholders. One of the most formidable challenges in maintaining relationships among these groups is dealing with conflict in an effective and outcome-oriented way. Throughout this course, students will learn the necessary skills to approach conflict in a way that produces beneficial results for the individual stakeholders and the organizations involved.
Prerequisite: MGT231 or MGT332.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 471: Management Seminar

Management Seminar is designed to provide the Management Concentration senior with in-depth coverage of important and timely topics. In a given semester there may be several related topics covered. Typically, the course will include lectures, discussion and cases of a contemporary nature. Elective for Business Administration Management concentration students. Others admitted with permission of Management Department Chairperson.
Prerequisite: MGT231 or MGT332.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 472: Transnational Management

This course is an in-depth study of the motivation for internationalization, organization and strategies of transnational firms and the related management challenges in dealing with cultural and environmental issues, organizational problems in international operations, planning and control, corporate social responsibility and ethics, international and human resource management, and global leadership. Prerequisites: BUS170, MGT332, MKT241N, and junior status.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 475: Interpersonal Relations for Managers

Business relies on establishing and maintaining relationships within and across organizational and national boundaries. The course uses principles of emotional intelligence as the foundation for acquiring and practicing the professional social skills on which relationships rely. The skills include persuading clients, impressing your boss and winning over co-workers. The lessons learned through this course provide knowledge and practical skills essential to successful professional careers.
Prerequisite: BUS170.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 485: Internship in Management

An academic work program under the auspices of various business and non-profit organizations in areas directly related to the student's academic interest in Management. Number of credit hours will vary with commitment. Must meet departmental requirements and have departmental chair's approval on credit hours before registration. May be used to satisfy up to four Management concentration electives. Limited to Management concentration Juniors and Seniors.

Credits: 3.00 - 12.00

MGT 780: Management Theory and Application

This course examines the major concepts and findings of the behavioral sciences which have particular relevance to management. Topics include communication, motivation, and small group processes. The course also provides an opportunity to learn and practice management skills within a postmodern framework that embraces the notion of corporate social responsibility.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 800: Managing Human Performance in Organizations

As a continuation of the Management Theory and Application course (MGT780), this course focuses on both understanding and coping with the more complex relationships found in larger organizations. An opportunity is provided to apply knowledge about people in organizations to the improvement of organizational systems and to the process of achieving changes in organizations.
Prerequisites: matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 804: Human Resource Management

Human resource management is approached from the perspective of the general manager. Managers need to know how to administer the personnel who report to them, and managers need to develop an understanding of the human resource policies of the organization as a whole. The course addresses both concerns. Important topics concerning selection, training, compensation, labor relations, and planning are covered.

Credits: 3.00

MGT 805: Leadership Studies

Leadership is presented from both a theoretical and practical point of view. Since there is no comprehensive theory of leadership, the major theories will be studied: Trait theory, behavioral theory, contingency theory and transformational leadership. Several topics are intertwined with leadership but will be studied as independent topics: power, motivation, and management style. Leadership has many practical aspects. Some of those which will be covered: stress, dealing with corporate culture, and gender and race issues.

Credits: 3.00

MIS 201: Introduction to Information Systems

This course is an introduction to the use of information systems in business organizations. It is designed to provide students with an overview of information systems and development concepts, along with a working knowledge of some of the most popular tools available. Emphasis will be placed on using technology to solve real business problems. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Business Administration majors.
Prerequisite: BUS170.

Credits: 3.00

MIS 305: Mis Special Topics

The management information systems field has changed considerably in recent years and it continues to evolve rapidly. This course is designed to cover various topics that are currently important but not covered in regular courses. A sample list of special topics may include business programming, web development, decision support and expert systems, semantic web, social network analysis, global information systems, information security and privacy, information system and social responsibility, and information systems integration. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: MIS 201.

Credits: 3.00

MIS 310: Project Management Methods

This course is an introduction to the principles and applications of project management techniques with an emphasis on managerial methods. Topics include project planning, work team design, project estimation techniques, project reporting, identifying and controlling project risks, budgets, and quality assurance. Students will learn to use a project management system in order to practice and apply the above techniques. Three lecture hours per week. Required in the Business Administration Management Information System concentration, elective in Business Administration Operations and Decision Sciences concentration, and open to others by permission of the Department Chairperson.
Prerequisite: BUS170.

Credits: 3.00

MIS 320: Electronic Commerce

This course is designed to familiarize individuals with current and emerging business processes that utilize electronic data transmission technologies including the Internet. Topics include network and Internet technology for business advantage, enterprise-wide business functions and processes, re-engineering of legacy processes through electronic commerce, and Internet-based business-to-consumer business ventures. Social, political, and ethical issues associated with electronic commerce are reviewed. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: MIS201. Not open to students who have received credit for MIS 466.

Credits: 3.00

MIS 330: Database Management

This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about Database Management Systems (DBMS) with an emphasis on relational databases. Students will learn the database development process, including analysis, design and implementation. Two threads will weave together in the course: one theoretical and general, another practical and specific. Three lecture hours per week. Required in the Business Administration Management Information Systems concentration, elective in the Business Administration Operations and Decision Sciences concentration, and open to other by permission of the Department Chairperson.
Prerequisite: MIS201. Not open to students who have received credit for MIS 410.

Credits: 3.00

MIS 340: Networks and Security

This course provides instruction in data communications and computer network definitions, concepts and principles, including (but not limited to): topologies, protocols, switches and routers. Required in the Business Administration Management Information Systems concentration and open to others by permission of the Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for MIS 420.
Prerequisite: MIS 201.

Credits: 3.00

MIS 450: Systems Analysis and Design

This course covers major issues in the analysis and design of information systems. Topics explored include general systems theory, systems planning, feasibility study, systems development life cycle, managing systems project, requirements modeling, process modeling, data modeling, data design, user interface design, implementation management, systems security, maintenance and support. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: Two of the following three courses: MIS 310, MIS 330, and MIS 340.

Credits: 3.00

MIS 485: Internship in Management Information Systems

An academic work program under the auspices of various business and non-profit organizations in areas directly related to the student's academic interest in MIS. Minimum commitment: 9 hours per week for the entire semester. Limited to MIS concentration Seniors.
Prerequisite: Department of Marketing and Decision Science Chairperson's approval.

Credits: 3.00

MIS 800: Managing Information Technology

This graduate level MIS course is designed to give students, potential manages, and active managers a thorough and practical guide to IT/IS management practices and issues. The course will focus on the strategic potential, design and application of IT dependent strategic initiatives of a firm, in the current innovative, dynamic, and competitive landscape.
Prerequisites: matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 241N: Principles of Marketing

An introduction to marketing and marketing management through an examination of the overall marketing system. Attention is given to the marketing mix elements of product, price, promotion, and distribution, as well as the research and organization necessary to implement marketing strategy. Cases and projects are used as models for decision-making in marketing strategy. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Business Administration majors and minors and Marketing minors. Not open to students who have received credits for MKT241.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 305: Marketing of Services

Service industries are rapidly emerging as the most dominant force in most world economies. This course will focus on the vital importance of service industries such as financial, healthcare, entertainment, tourism, hospitality and automobile services and the role they play in today's economy. It will build on the basic marketing course by focusing on the strategies and problems specific to service businesses. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for Marketing concentration students, and others with permission of the Department Chairperson.
Prerequisite: MKT241N.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 320: Hospitality Marketing and Sales

Application of marketing principles in hotel, restaurant and institutional management settings. Included in this are marketing and sales conventions, clubs, and casinos. Includes the functions, interrelationships and coordination of all hospitality departments and their roles in assuring success of the marketing efforts.
Prerequisites: HRI201, MKT241N.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 342: Consumer Behavior

This course examines the role of the consumer in the economy. It is designed to integrate the conventional concepts of consumer behavior, psychology, anthropology and sociology with marketing to explain, understand and predict consumer decisions. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Marketing minor Juniors or Seniors. Elective for Marketing concentration Juniors and Seniors, elective for Entrepreneurship Concentration, and others with permission of the Department Chairperson.
Prerequisites: MKT241N, PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 343: Advertising

This course deals with the advertising function in marketing. It begins with an explanation of the nature of advertising, its role in the marketing mix and its application to the needs of non-profit institutions as well as commercial enterprise. It introduces the student to advertising budgets and media selection. It identifies target markets through demographics, sociographics and psychographics. It teaches advertising as long range institutional objective rather than a short-term remedy. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Marketing minor Juniors or Seniors. Elective for Marketing concentration Juniors and Seniors and others with permission of Department Chairperson.
Prerequisites: MKT241N, PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 344: Retailing

The course studies retail management, retail competition, planning, organizational structure, location, layout, merchandising, and control. Case studies and projects will be used to further the development and understanding of the Retail process. Three lecture hours per week. Elective limited to Marketing concentration and Marketing minor Juniors and Seniors, and others with permission of Department Chairperson.
Prerequisite: MKT241N.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 346: Sports Marketing

The marketing of sports teams, athletes, and equipment through an examination of the overall marketing system. Attention to the marketing mix elements of product, price, promotion and distribution as well as the research and organization necessary to implement marketing strategy in the sports world. Cases and projects are used as models for decision making in marketing strategy. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 347: Guerrilla Marketing

Guerrilla Marketing is a contemporary approach to marketing and promotion. It applies traditional and novel promotional techniques in creative/non-traditional ways that yield extraordinary results, with modest budgets. This course develops guerrilla marketing perspectives and techniques through reading, illustration and case studies. Course learning activities include writing assignments and class exercises designed to integrate with students' service learning experiences. The course focuses on the practical application of key concepts, leading to the development of a Guerrilla Marketing Campaign.
Prerequisite: MKT241N and W-I course or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

MKT 351N: Business Marketing

A description and evaluation of the major activities involved in the marketing of products and services where other business firms and organizations are the customers. This course will include the analysis of the business market structure, habits and motives of the purchasers, types of products, pricing policies, physical distribution and the decision-making process relevant to marketing business products or services. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Marketing minor, Juniors or Seniors. Elective for Marketing concentration Juniors or Seniors, and others with permission of the Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received credit for MKT351.
Prerequisites: MKT241N, PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 444N: Marketing Management and Strategy

Application of marketing management and strategic concepts in a case problem and market simulation format. Emphasis on marketing planning, implementation of the marketing mix and utilization of market research information. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Marketing concentration Juniors or Seniors. Limited to Marketing concentration and Marketing minor, Juniors and Seniors, and others with permission of the Department Chairperson.
Prerequisites: MKT241N, ODS362, MIS201 and ACC106.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 445: International Marketing

The course deals with the ever expanding global market and the unlimited opportunities and challenges. The student participates in the study and application of marketing concepts in the contemporary international environment while examining special problems, issues, goals and decision processes that characterize multinational marketing. The course emphasizes the marketing firm, marketing operations and marketing strategy. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Marketing concentration and Marketing minor Juniors or Seniors.
Prerequisite: MKT241N.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 466: Special Topics in Marketing

An analysis of topics of current interest in the marketing field. Topics vary from term to term. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: MKT241N or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 485: Internship in Marketing

An academic work program under the auspices of various business and non-profit organizations in areas directly related to the student's academic interest in Marketing. Minimum commitment: 18 hours per week for entire semester. Limited to Marketing concentration Seniors.
Prerequisite: Department of Marketing Chairperson's approval.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 543: Marketing Research

Introduces tools and techniques of marketing research as an aid to marketing decision making. Covers definitions of research problems, research methodologies, design of research projects, analysis and interpretation of research results. Emphasizes practical aspects of conducting and evaluating marketing research studies. The completed marketing research project report will serve as the senior thesis for Marketing concentration students. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Marketing concentration Seniors. Enrollment limited to Marketing concentration and Marketing minor Seniors, and others by permission of Department Chairperson.
Prerequisites: MKT241N, MIS362 or ODS362 or ODS262.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 720: Fundamentals of Marketing

This course introduces the student to the marketing function of organizations, including product/service, pricing, distribution, and communication strategies. Topics include customer/client analysis, market research, the role of marketing in society, and global marketing concepts, for both profit and nonprofit organizations. Course format: lectures, reading, and case studies.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 800: Consumer Behavior

This course is designed to analyze the role of the consumer in the economy drawing upon general and social psychology, sociology, philosophy, anthropology, and economics. Integration of conventional concepts with marketing to better understand consumer choices. The course examines marketing opportunities through a better understanding of the consumer.

Credits: 3.00

MKT 805: Marketing Management and Strategy

This course provides students with a solid foundation in understanding marketing strategies that determine competitiveness in dynamic consumer and organizational markets. Particular areas of emphasis include industry analyses, dynamics of competition, segmentation strategies, target marketing, positioning strategies, and marketing planning. The students will develop strategic thinking and in-depth analytical skills through the application of marketing tools and models.
Prerequisites: matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator

Credits: 3.00

ODS 262: Quantitative Analysis

This course introduces quantitative analysis applicable in a business setting. The collection, tabulation, representation, presentation, analysis and interpretation of data, as applicable to decision making in such areas as quality control, finance, accounting, marketing, management and research are examined from a descriptive and an inferential perspective. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ODS362.
Prerequisite: BUS170.

Credits: 3.00

ODS 300: Principles of Quality Management

An introduction to the theory and practice of quality management, history, terminology, and techniques.The course will integrate the philosophy, techniques, and research in the field. It will consider aspects of quality management in the design, development, manufacture, purchasing, distribution, marketing, servicing, and other operational support functions, both internal and external to the firm. Key principles of quality management to include leadership, strategic planning, human resources, process management, and customer satisfaction will be examined through lectures, case study approach, and industry site visits. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for MIS440.
Prerequisites: MIS362 or ODS362, MGT231 or MGT332.

Credits: 3.00

ODS 320: Managerial Decisions and Risk

An examination of the structuring of business decisions involving uncertainty. Emphasis will be placed on the application of Bayesian Networks and Influence Diagrams as tools to assist in the decision making process. A comprehensive approach to analyzing risk using probability, sensitivity analysis and the psychological aspects of decision making such as framing and grounding will be covered. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: BUS170

Credits: 3.00

ODS 333: Operations and Logistics Management

Management of production and service operations. Design of products, scheduling, dispatching, supply chain management, quality and cost control, selection of plant and equipment, and plant layout enabled by operations research methods. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ODS433.
Prerequisite: ACC106.

Credits: 3.00

ODS 340: Introduction to Business Intelligence

This course introduces students to the technologies, applications and processes for user-centered exploration of data, data relationships and trends used to improve the information about an organization and its competitors for business planning and decision making. This course approaches business intelligence from the managerial perspective and emphasizes Business Intelligence (BI) application and implementation to drive positive business actions. Concepts of performance management, business metrics, data visualization, and the use of technology solutions will be covered. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: BUS170

Credits: 3.00

ODS 370: Data Mining

An examination of data mining with emphasis placed on machine learning topics such as classification using Bayesian approaches, Neural Networks, CART, Decision Trees, Regression, Nearest Neighbor and other techniques. Use of bootstrap methods, bagging and boosting will be covered. Data preparation on how to handle missing data and evaluation concepts such as cross validation, ROC and confusion matrices will be covered. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: BUS170

Credits: 3.00

ODS 375: Business Systems Optimization

This course is offered for students who are interested in the multidisciplinary design aspects of complex systems. The focus of this course is on the quantitative aspect of design, analysis and implementation of systems. The objective of the course is to present tools and methodologies for performing system optimization in a multidisciplinary design context. Focus will be equally strong on all three aspects of the problem: (i) the multidisciplinary character of business systems, (ii) design of these complex systems, and (iii) tools for optimization and evaluation. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: BUS170

Credits: 3.00

ODS 380: Simulation and Risk Analysis

This course introduces students to technologies and practices for simulation used to model complex systems. This course covers modeling and simulation principles with applications to complex systems. It covers modeling and risk assessment approaches with a focus on continuous and discrete event simulation. This course surveys applications of simulation for complex systems across a broad range of domains. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: BUS170

Credits: 3.00

ODS 467: Forecasting and Predictive Analytics

An examination of short- and long-term forecasting methods, and their application in planning, decision-making and control. The traditional forecasting methods will be augmented by inclusion of prediction methods such as logistic regression and neural networks. Applications directly related to all subject areas of Business will be covered and software used for forecasting and prediction will be used. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving, class discussion, and computer application. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Business Administration, ODS Concentration. Not open to students who have received credit for MIS467.
Prerequisites: ODS 262, MAT 108 or MAT 208.

Credits: 3.00

ODS 495: Internship in Operations and Decision Sciences

This course provides students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for supervised professional training and experience in an actual work environment. This Internship is an ongoing seminar between the student, the faculty member and the employment supervisor. It involves a Learning Contract, periodic meetings with the faculty representative, professional experience at a level equivalent to other senior-level courses, and submission of materials as established in the Learning Contract.
Minimum commitment: 12 hours per week for entire semester. Limited to ODS Concentration Juniors and Seniors only.
Prerequisite: Department Chairperson's approval.

Credits: 3.00

ODS 710: Quantitative Analysis

This course focuses on the process of statistical inference whereby the analyst is able to infer or draw conclusions about the parameters of a data set on the basis of statistics derived from samples. Topics include: data organization, graphing and descriptive measures, estimation techniques, hypothesis testing and regression analysis; as applied to the decision making process in business.

Credits: 3.00

ODS 800: Operations Management

The course deals with concepts and principles related to the conversion process: the inputs of materials, investment, and labor producing finished goods and services. Taught from a management point of view. Topics include product/process design, capacity planning, plant layout, production scheduling, quality control, demand forecasting, human engineering, job design and inventory management. Relationships to other major business functions are explored.
Prerequisites: matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

ODS 850: Management Information Systems II

This course embraces two major topics. The first is an introduction to the database approach for design of integrated information applications. It covers data base design, data structures, data definition and manipulation languages, and data base implementation and evaluation. The second is advanced systems management. It covers personnel career planning and turnover, capacity planning, standards development, software conversion problems and disaster recovery.

Credits: 3.00

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